United States Patent US 9,115,913 B1

Read the whole US Patent
Download the ZIP file of US Patent

40,464 comments to United States Patent US 9,115,913 B1

  • Andrea Rossi

    Z.Roeden:
    We are preparing what you are asking for.
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Z.Roeden

    Dear Dr. Rossi,
    without many demonstration you can’t reach the aim of one million pre-orders.
    At your website you show a 3 KW ecat ngu. So why you don’t show all kind of tests with it?
    Also your office surely has a coffeemaker, an electric kettle or else.
    Why no short videos about some tests?
    Best regards
    Z. Roeden

  • Andrea Rossi

    Jan Holt:
    It depends on the specific situations,
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Andrea Rossi

    Steven Nicholes Karels:
    Thank you for your suggestions,
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Steven Nicholes Karels

    Dear Andrea Rossi,

    What should a demonstration of a NGU-based solar panel supplementation look like?

    A suggestion:

    1. An outdoor demonstration using actual sunlight and subject to normal conditions (sun angle, clouds, weather effects).
    2. Two identical solar panels, mounted in the same manner, facing south (towards the sun).
    3. Each solar panel has a power meter. This could be a measure of the DC voltage from the solar panel (preferred), or the output from an off-grid inverter (acceptable), into a resistive load.
    4. Each power meter should display voltage, current, power, and total energy.
    5. A clock (analog or digital) to show the passage of time.
    6. Internet video showing each solar panel’s output.

    Another available video showing the two solar panels power performance for one complete day before the installation of the NGU supplementation.
    Another video showing how the NGU supplementation was integrated with the solar panel including testing and validation methods employed.

    Thoughts?

  • Jan Holt

    Dear Dr. Rossi,

    which E-CAT model is or will be suitable for being combined with photovoltaic panels?

    10 Watt model?
    100 Watt model?
    Some new model?

    Best Regards

    Jan Holt

  • Andrea Rossi

    Steven Nicholes Karels,
    Thank you for the suggestion,
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Steven Nicholes Karels

    Dear Andrea Rossi,

    An alternative way of funding the initial NGU manufacturing – leasing

    Assume an existing State-owned solar park with the capacity of 200 MW solar production (or more).

    Divide the solar park into two conceptual parks, each of 100 MW (or more) each. One will be equipped with NGU units and the other left untouched and used as a basis for comparison.

    1. Manufacture 333,334 300W NGU unit for solar panel supplementation – use leasing capitol to pay for the initial manufacturing.
    2. Assumption – with a sales price of $2.50USD per Watt, it is reasonable to believe the actual cost to manufacture is $1.25USD per Watt (or less).
    3. The cost to manufacture the initial NGU units will be 100 Million times $1.25 USD or $125 million USD (or less).
    4. Install the 300W NGU units on each of 333,334 solar panels in the solar park supplementation side.
    5. While the NGU unit runs 24/7, it will only add power to the solar panel output when the solar panel is NOT exposed to the maximum sunlight – assume 14 hours per day of less than maximum exposure – nighttime and early and late times of daylight or cloudy days or weather events.
    6. Assume a reimbursement (sale) price of $40USD per MW-hr.
    7. Number of MW-hrs per day is 1400.
    8. Reimbursement per day is $56,000 USD.
    9. Annual reimbursement is $20,440,000 USD.
    10 Annual Return On Investment (ROI) is 16.35%.

    Compute the non-supplemental solar park total energy per solar panel per day and compute the increase in the supplemental solar park total energy produced per day per solar panel as a basis for reimbursement. The two solar parks are assumed to be in the same environment.

    This assumes that the installation is trivial and the NGU units are reliable and they operate correctly over the environment.
    Reimbursement rates taken from US figures (on the low side).
    14 hours per day is likely on the low side, but depends on location (e.g., latitude).

    Thoughts?

  • Steven Nicholes Karels

    Wilfried,

    The inverters already exist. They are called solar all-in-one inverters. I like the EG4 6000XP. Each unit accepts 2 phases. Use three such units for 3-phase power. They self-synchronize. They also accommodate generate input, and storage batteries (possibly needed for motor transients) and communications to a cell phone to a status and control app. Instead of using solar PV inputs, use NGU units, serially connected to be in the proper voltage level. Each unit can handle 6kW, so, three units would accommodate 18 kW. Each 6000XP costs about $1,500 USD. You can look on YouTube for reviews, etc. They can also be used in off-Grid applications. Higher output units also exist, i.e., 18 kW. They can handle both US and EU power.

    Using existing, certified equipment is generally less expensive, and more likely to be accepted by local electrical inspectors when approving a new installation. If AR did such a demonstration using two 3kW NGU units per inverter, I believe that would be a significant selling point.

  • Andrea Rossi

    Giulia:
    For singular modules up to 100 W yes, for assemblies no. Leonardo Corporation will be able to sell them as an optional, but the Clients can also buy them independently depending on their specific situations,
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Andrea Rossi

    Steven Nicholes Karels,
    Thank you for the suggestions,
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Andrea Rossi

    Wilfried:
    Thank you for your insight,
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Wilfried

    Dear Andrea

    In the meantime, I’m no longer really convinced by the idea that the large orders should come from the automotive industry, because car companies certainly demand proof of a low MTBF in mass production and of course you can’t prove that before mass use. So the automotive industry won’t be a starter.
    I would find universal generators much more promising:
    4 kW peak load, small capacitor for high starting currents, inverter to national voltage (240 Vac in EU), mains socket for consumers, data connection to synchronize three such devices to three-phase current with 12 kW (with cable adapter three-phase socket and three mains cables) and connection option to domestic grid with battery and photovoltaics.
    This would be a completely universal device that could also be used as a charging station for cars or as a power supply on construction sites.
    Think about whether this would be worth a second strategy. I would order three such devices for three-phase current and house connection.

    Best Regards
    Wilfried

  • Steven Nicholes Karels

    Dear Andrea Rossi,

    In India along, there are at least five major solar parks with a combined total power capacity of 7.17 GW of electrical power generation.

    Assume that you were to add eCat technology in parallel with individual solar panels and the NGU units were running at 75% of the maximum solar panel output, so as to reflect lower nighttime demand. If fully implemented, the added eCat technology would provide about 5.3 GW of electrical power generation.

    This might be implemented with three 100W NGU units, tied in series, to produce 36 VDC at 300W running in parallel to the solar panel’s output. The solar panel would produce a higher voltage at peak illumination but a lower voltage at low levels of solar illumination. The panel’s inverter, regardless of whether it was a microinverter, or if the solar panel was part of a string of panels going to a string inverter, the inverter would see continuous power from either the solar panel or the NGU units, whichever had the higher voltage.

    If you started with one of the smaller solar parks, say the Rewa Ultra Mega solar park, which has a power generation capacity of 0.75 GW, you could demonstrate an NGU capacity of 0.56 GW. This 560 MW NGU addition would include more than enough units to meet your requirement for 100 MW to go into full scale production.

    And there are other countries with large solar parks.

    I would assume you would develop a unit that produces 300W at 36VDC and that it would mount beneath the solar panel. It would accept power from the solar panel. The unit would output the highest voltage, providing power that goes to the existing infrastructure inverter. Of course, the unit would need to be weatherproof, etc.

    Thoughts?

Leave a Reply

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>