Binuclear Atoms: a model to explain Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

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by
Paolo Accomazzi
E-mail: paolo.accomazzi@gmail.com
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Abstract
In this paper we show that Helium-like Hydrogen spectra obtained by Randell L. Mills and Ultra Dense Hydrogen obtained by Holmlid [2] are interpretable as experimental evidences of Binuclear Atoms.
The Hydrogen Binuclear Atom, a model proposed 25 years ago, is a metastable configuration in which the two nuclei are held together at a very short distance in an atom-like configuration.
This should be a peculiar con guration of the Hydrogen molecule where nuclei are characterized by a high kinetic energy, and nuclear motion is coupled with electronic motion.
This is a completely different model from the usual Born-Oppenheimer picture of atoms and molecules we are used to, where nuclei oscillate about their equilibrium positions and electronic motion is decoupled from the nuclear one.
The identification of Helium-like Hydrogen Spectra and Ultra Dense Hydrogen as Binuclear Atoms has a strong impact on one of the main objections to Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR): the overcoming of the Coulomb barrier thus identifying a sound mechanism for the occurrence of LENR.
Far for being conclusive, this work has the only aim to take this hypothesis more seriously, and focus the attention of people interested in LENR mechanism on this subject.
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59 comments to Binuclear Atoms: a model to explain Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

  • Andrea Rossi

    Hergen:
    For the assemblies too.
    Thanks for your kind wishes.
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Dear Mr. Rossi,

    If I remember correctly, you said you had to solve 3 problems:
    – safety
    – reliability
    – controlability
    Have you solved these problems and if yes, have you solved these problems not only for single modules bur for a whole reactor?

    Thank you for your answer and good luck with your important experiment this week.

  • Andrea Rossi

    Frank Acland:
    The answer is “yes”.
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Frank Acland

    Dear Andrea,

    I understand you are not at mass production stage at this point. My question was to learn if you think technology is developed enough to build power plants (control, stability, durability, sufficient temperature, etc.), once you have sufficient production capability.

    Thank you very much,

    Frank Acland

  • Andrea Rossi

    Frank Acland:
    Attention: I did not say that we are ready now to produce on industrial scale the E-Cat: I said that we are ready to produce industrial plants able to be coupled with the Carnot cycle system.
    Our construction and delivery time is not yet comparable to the time allowed by a massive industrial production, that is our target, but not our present capacity.
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Frank Acland

    Dear Andrea,

    You say that you are now ready to produce electricity via Carnot cycle on an industrial scale.

    As you know, every year multi-megawatt coal plants are retired, having passed their useful lifespan, and thus we lose a source of grid power, while our world’s thirst for energy increases.

    Is the E-Cat QX developed enough now to be able to fuel a power station generating 500 MW of electricity (the average size of a US coal plant)?

    Kind regards,

    Frank Acland

  • Andrea Rossi

    Henry Farrell:
    I think at this point I can answer yes.
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Henry Farrell

    Dear Dr Andrea Rossi,
    Did I understand well that you consider the industrial plants made by assemblies of E-Cat QXes ready for to study their massive industrialization?
    Cheers,
    Henry

  • Andrea Rossi

    Alessandro Coppi:
    We got our precautions.
    Thanks for the concern.
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

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