Saving steam costs in paper producing companies using the Ecat

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by
Ulrich W.A. Kranz

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Steam consumption in paper producing companies

In papermaking operations, the expense of drying paper with steam plays an important role.

Depending on the thickness of the paper, on the production speed and on the width of the paper web, about 100 t / h of steam are needed for the paper machines for drying the paper.

A ton of steam costs on average 18-23 euros. At around 8200 operating hours per year, at least 14,760,000 euros must be expended for the steam demand of 100 t / h.

With the heat generator Ecat QX 1 MW, these costs can be significantly reduced.

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22 comments to Saving steam costs in paper producing companies using the Ecat

  • Andrea Rossi

    Lars:
    That could surely be an eventual step, but in this first step we sell heat and the Client makes what he wants with it. We sell heat at the temperature the Customer wants, eventually the Customer can do electricity.
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Lars

    Dear Andrea,
    what I ment was that you can make the electrcity of the heat and sell only the electrcity. And it will be up to the costumer to decide what to do with the electricity.

  • Andrea Rossi

    Lars:
    No, I think the Ecat will have its lead in the production of heat, that is a “fundamental field”, from which derive the other fields, like electricity.
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Lars

    Dear Andrea.
    Do you think that the Ecat eventually only will be used for electricity production? There is no limit of demand
    of electrcity so all your working efforts could go to produce electricity and sell that electricity to the grid.

  • Andrea Rossi

    Italo:
    We can test it if you send a small sample of at least 5 square cm, along with a data sheet and the price per square meter for 100 sq m to:
    Leonardo Corporation
    1331 Lincoln Rd S.te 601
    Miami Beach, FL 33139
    USA

    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Italo

    Dear Ing.Rossi,
    jointly with the MoD Italy we developed a NANOMATERIAL with the following tested characteristics: thickness half centimeter-one side 1300°C – the other side 500°C – as long as you need- not expensive -not heavy- easy to handle .Maybe it can be used as isolator for your E-Cat X?
    Italo

  • Andrea Rossi

    Lars:
    Our COP is related to thermal power. The COP of the systems of conversion do not change: e.g., the efficiency of the carnot cycle remains what it is with any heat source.
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Lars

    Dear Andrea,
    how much power of electricity can you get from 20kW termal power?

  • Andrea Rossi

    Toby:
    Bizarre: to keep alive the pilot after the ionizing radiation emitted from this hot nuclear fusion reactor would be necessary 20 Tonns of lead around him. Besides the reactor, as it is described, can’t work because the electtromagneric shielding of the walls could not be stable at those energies and the reactor would sublimate in fractions of second, if it ever could be able to start.
    Good luck!
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Toby

    Are you aware of the patent about nuclear fusion reactor by Lockheed Martin?

    See https://www.siliconrepublic.com/machines/lockheed-martin-nuclear-fusion-jet-fighter

  • Andrea Rossi

    Frank Acland:
    It will be shown at the presentation.
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Frank Acland

    Dear Andrea,

    What is the size of the 20 kW E-Cat SK? Will this be shown at the upcoming presentation?

    Thank you very much,

    Frank Acland

  • Andrea Rossi

    Albert Ellul:
    The highest rated module we are able to make now is the 20 kW Ecat SK, which can be combined with as many modules you want to reach the power you want.
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Albert Ellul

    Dear Andrea,

    I had submitted the following question:

    “What is currently the best practical set up of a system that couples an E-Cat based heat source and a steam-turbine/alternator system, in terms of Mega Watts electrical?”

    For which you had kindly answered:
    “I think that the best system will be a gas turbine fueled by the Ecat SK.”

    Obviously the gas turbine you have recommended is a closed cycle one, which I wholeheartedly agree with for many technical and environmental reasons. But my curiosity is in the set up and size (MW electric) of the best arrangement incorporating your technology, (you have recommended the Ecat SK) supplying heat to a market-ready close circuit gas turbine-alternator system.

    For example, will your factory be able to construct a multi Ecat SK module unit supplying 1 MW thermal energy to run, let’s say, a 300 kW gas turbine? What is the maximum power (thermal) that can be constructed in your factory?

  • Andrea Rossi

    Albert Ellul:
    Thank you for your kind attention to the work of our Team.
    Answer:
    I think that the best system will be a gas turbine fueled by the Ecat SK.
    Warm Regards
    A.R.

  • Andrea Rossi

    Sam:
    Thank you for this link.
    Warm Regards
    A.R.

  • Sam

    Hello Dr Rossi

    This is a video on the legacy of
    the Kepler space telescope.

    https://youtu.be/_V7J05fK5e0

    Regards
    Sam

  • Albert Ellul

    Dear Andrea,

    Congratulations for the progress made. May I wish you more successful years in the advancement of the E-Cat and its derivatives.

    The time of industrialisation of your technology is very close. I have been following your progress, successes, attempts at derailing your progress by others, and finally the imminent rollout of industrialised E-Cats designed to provide a modular, reliable and controllable source of high temperature heat that can be utilised for most applications currently in operation but heated by conventional fuels.

    Electricity being the most practical source for distributing energy through a grid, it is my opinion that E-Cats will be mostly used for such a purpose. Hence my question: What is currently the best practical set up of a system that couples an E-Cat based heat source and a steam-turbine/alternator system, in terms of Mega Watts electrical?

  • Andrea Rossi

    Frank Acland:
    Mr Ulrich Kranz has written his paper upon free interpretation of comments of mine. I am not the reviewer of his paper and I cannot comment in positive or in negative what he wrote. I respond exclusively of what I wrote and what I did not write is confidential.This said, everybody is free to make interpretations and formulate ideas, right or wrong as those might be.
    Warm Regards,
    A.R.

  • Frank Acland

    Dear Andrea,

    The paper posted here by Ulrich Kranz provides some detailed descriptions of the E-Cat QX plant. For example in section 4 titled “The drive of the plant” he states:

    “The Ecat QX 1 MW is powered by electricity. At the full load of 1 MW, a power of 2 kW is required for the drive. About 67% of the time, the E-Cat QX will be in SSM (self sustained) mode. The E-Cat QX does not require a higher startup performance compared to normal operation. In „self sustained“ mode, the reactor continues to emit heat, although no more electrical energy is supplied.”

    Is this accurate information?

    Many thanks,

    Frank Acland

  • Dan Galburt

    Dear Mr Ulrich Kranz:

    The posted paper is a marketing oriented analysis of using a 1 MW E-Cat Qx plant to heat steam for a real world industrial customer.

    Seems like a great application for the E-Cat QX. A single 1 MW plant would supply only a small fraction of the overall required power and be fully utilized thus minimizing cost per KWH. Assuming the overall cost of building and operating your initial E-Cat plants allow them to generate energy at less than 2 cent per KWH I would think trying one would be a no brainer for your customers.

    Questions

    1. Is 2KW value for required electrical power an average or peak value?

    2. Am I correct in assuming that the overall COP of the EC-Cat QX plant would be greater than 500?

    Achieving a COP of 500 in an installed industrial E-Cat plant would be an amazing achievement.

    I wish the best of luck

    Dan Galburt

  • Gerard McEk

    Dear Mr. Kranz,
    I am a bit disappointed about your paper.
    Yes, I agree that the paper industry would be a suitable customer for an Ecat, but you dit not provide any tangible details of how much the cost saving would be.
    Obviously you need some details for this from the Leonardo Company of how much their steam would cost, but that has not been provided, unfortunately. That makes your paper not really worth while to read, because the heading of your paper promises more than you provide.
    Further I wonder if the Leonardo Comany agrees with your starting points like:
    – Is it right you need only a 2 kW power connection to drive a 1 MW E-cat QX steam plant?
    – Is it right that every 6-12 months you will have an outage of ‘several’ 2? days for QX reactor exchange? Are you assuming the full 1 MW power will be used continuously?
    I assume the cost for Ecat exchange is included in the cost of deliverd heat.
    – Is it right that contracts must be for 60 months? Or could it be more, or less and what happens if less or more heat is delivered?
    I believe that you should only publish such a paper when you can provide details, approved by the Leonardo Company, that support your assumption that it is more economical. Now it is just a guess.
    Regards, Gerard

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